Friday, April 12, 2019

More great new titles have hit the library!




The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

"An unforgettable―and Hollywood-bound―new thriller... A mix of Hitchcockian suspense, Agatha Christie plotting, and Greek tragedy."



The Last Romantics: A Novel by Tara Conklin

“Conklin examines her characters’ lives with generosity and an unflinching eye for the complexities of love and family.... Fans of Jonathan Franzen’s The Corrections will find similar pleasures in the intelligence and empathy on display here.”






Stranger Things: Suspicious Minds: The first official Stranger Things novel by Gwenda Bond



“Suspicious Minds is the prequel story that fans have been waiting for.”





Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Another great selection of bestsellers are available @ your library




The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump by Andrew G. McCabe


"McCabe’s book speaks with bracing directness about what was going on and why it matters...anyone who has followed Trump will recognize the accuracy of the portrayal of him in The Threat.






The Source of Self-Regard: Selected Essays, Speeches, and Meditations by Toni Morrison

“Close your eyes and make a wish. Wish that one of the most informed, smartest, most successful people in your profession walks into your living room, pulls up a chair and says, “This is what I’ve been thinking. …” That’s “The Source of Self-Regard… The bursts of rumination examine world history, skirt religion, scour philosophy, racism, anti-Semitism, femininity, war and folk tales…There’s even a tidbit or two about her closely guarded personal life. But the real magic is witnessing her mind and imagination at work… This book demonstrates once again that Morrison is more than the standard bearer of American literature. She is our greatest singer. And this book is perhaps her most important song.”

  
Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe by Roger McNamee

“[An] excellent new book . . . [McNamee] is one of the social network’s biggest critics. He’s a canny and persuasive one too. In “Zucked,” McNamee lays out an argument why it and other tech giants have grown into a monstrous threat to democracy. Better still he offers tangible solutions . . . What makes McNamee so credible is his status as a Silicon Valley insider. He also has a knack for distilling often complex or meandering TED Talks and Medium posts about the ills of social media into something comprehensible, not least for those inside the D.C. Beltway . . . McNamee doesn’t just scream fire, though. He also provides a reasonable framework for solving some of the issues . . . For anyone looking for a primer on what’s wrong with social media and what to do about it, the book is well worth the read.”



The Library Book by Susan Orlean

“Exquisitely written, consistently entertaining . . . A loving tribute not just to a place or an institution but to an idea . . . What makes The Library Book so enjoyable is the sense of discovery that propels it, the buoyancy when Orlean is surprised or moved by what she finds. . . . Her depiction of the Central Library fire on April 29, 1986, is so rich with specifics that it’s like a blast of heat erupting from the page. . . . The Library Book is about the fire and the mystery of how it started—but in some ways that’s the least of it. It’s also a history of libraries, and of a particular library, as well as the personal story of Orlean and her mother, who was losing her memory to dementia while Orlean was retrieving her own memories by writing this book.”




Monday, April 8, 2019

New bestseller titles available now!



The Golden Tresses of the Dead: A Flavia de Luce Novel by Alan Bradley


“Flavia de Luce hasn’t lost a sister, she’s gained a case—and what a case. . . . Perhaps the most consistently hilarious adventure of the alarmingly precocious heroine.”



The Boy: A Novel by Tami Hoag


“Husband-and-wife detective teams stretch back as far as Dashiell Hammett, but Hoag ensures that her pair have a very individual quality, encapsulated in their razor-sharp dialogue.”






Early Riser: A Novel by Jasper Fforde

"Charlie's journey . . . is so absorbing, and Fforde's wit so sharp, the reveal that the narrative is also a commentary on capitalism comes across as a brilliant twist. . . . Whip-smart, tremendous fun, and an utter delight from start to finish."




Friday, April 5, 2019

More great titles have hit the shelves @ your library



The First Conspiracy: The Secret Plot to Kill George Washington by Brad Meltzer and Josh Mensch



"[Meltzer and Mensch] bring a propulsive energy to the narrative―it can be difficult to create tension and suspense in a nonfiction book where the reader already knows how the story ends, but the authors do a great job keeping the reader turning the pages.... Nothing about the book is phoned in; the amount of research behind it is genuinely remarkable. The First Conspiracy is an excellent book, enthralling and beyond fascinating, and it's sure to delight both fans of thrillers and American history."
NPR





Parkland: Birth of a Movement by Dave Cullen

“In the hands of a less-skilled writer, a project like Parkland might risk becoming the type of uplifting but empty text that typically arrives with aspirations of cashing in on a cultural moment. Instead, Cullen utilizes the moment to amplify the Parkland students’ calls for actions while situating his views within a structure of quality reporting that emphasizes facts above emotions.”

Spearhead: An American Tank Gunner, His Enemy, and a Collision of Lives in World War II by Adam Makos 

“[Spearhead is] a compelling, exciting adventure . . . An in-the-moment re-creation of the Allied breakthrough of the West Wall into Nazi Germany by a remarkable cadre of tank crewmen of the 3rd Armored Division.”

The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming by David Wallace-Wells

"The Uninhabitable Earth is the most terrifying book I have ever read. Its subject is climate change, and its method is scientific, but its mode is Old Testament. The book is a meticulously documented, white-knuckled tour through the cascading catastrophes that will soon engulf our warming planet.”



Wednesday, April 3, 2019

You are not going to want to miss out on these continuing stories!



Black Leopard, Red Wolf (The Dark Star Trilogy) by Marlon James

“James’ visions don’t jettison you from reality so much as they trap you in his mad-genius, mercurial mind. . . . Drenched in African myth and folklore, and set in an astonishingly realized pre-colonized sub-Saharan region, Black Leopard crawls with creatures and erects kingdoms unlike any I’ve read. . . .  This is a revolutionary book.”







Mission Critical (Gray Man Book 8) by Mark Greaney

“This novel is vintage Greaney, with a tight plot, a ticking clock, and a sympathetic antihero…This is good, Clancy-esque entertainment. May the evildoers of the world have nightmares that Violator becomes a real person.”





Of Blood and Bone: Chronicles of The One, Book 2 by Nora Roberts


"Roberts continues her apocalyptic Chronicles of The One with a mesmerizing follow-up that is bold and breathtaking...meeting the next generation and watching the heroine grow into her powers and leadership is enthralling."





The Rule of Law: A Novel (Dismas Hardy Book 18) by John Lescroart


"Lescroart plots so cleverly that he has you believing his split-level thriller is really a single foreshortened novel. The perfect read for those who agree that "it's only trouble if somebody's shooting at you."



Wednesday, March 27, 2019

New titles have hit the shelves @ your library


Figuring by Maria Popova

“Intimate . . . timely . . . Figuring thunders along with a novelistic intensity, propelled by the organic drama of its extraordinary lives . . . It speaks to the quality of Popova’s own writing that it survives comparison with the literary giants of the last four centuries. Her wonderfully deft and sincere prose melts down the raw materials of heavy research into a coruscating flow of ideas, images, and insights that add skin and sinew to the bones of biographical fact to create a forward-looking history that's both timely and timeless.”

Inheritance: A Memoir of Genealogy, Paternity, and Love by Dani Shapiro

"Inheritance reads like an emotional detective story...Shapiro is skilled at spinning her personal explorations into narrative gold... Life has handed her rich material. But her books work not just because the situations she writes about are inherently dramatic and relatable. Her prose is clear and often lovely, and her searching questions are unfailingly intelligent... The relevance of Shapiro's latest memoir extends beyond her own personal experience. Inheritance broaches issues about the moral ramifications of genealogical surprises."
NPR






The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present by David Treuer



“Vivid…Treuer evokes, with simmering rage, the annihilation of Indian lives and worlds, but he also unearths a secret history of Indians flourishing in art, government, literature, science and technology…Beautifully written.”


Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother's Will to Survive by Stephanie Land and Barbara Ehrenreich

"[Land's] book has the needed quality of reversing the direction of the gaze. Some people who employ domestic labor will read her account. Will they see themselves in her descriptions of her clients? Will they offer their employees the meager respect Land fantasizes about? Land survived the hardship of her years as a maid, her body exhausted and her brain filled with bleak arithmetic, to offer her testimony. It's worth listening to."






Never Enough: The Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction by Judith Grisel

“Grisel’s account of her wayward early 20s, chasing one high after another, is harrowing . . . She writes clearly and unsparingly about both her experiences and the science of addiction—tobacco and caffeine figure in, as well—making plain that there is still much that remains unknown or mysterious about the brain's workings. In the end, she notes, much of our present culture, which shuns pain and favors avoidance, is made up of ‘tools of addiction.’ Illuminating reading for those seeking to understand the whos, hows, and wherefores of getting hooked.”


Monday, March 25, 2019

New Bestsellers - Staff picks!

Verses for the Dead (Agent Pendergast) by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child

"The 18th installment in the Pendergast series by Preston and Child gives the hero a partner in the hunt for a strange killer... Pendergast is highly successful in closing cases on his own but 'was about as rogue as they came,' and suspects tend not to survive his investigations. Agent Coldmoon's secret assignment is to keep a close eye on his partner, 'a bomb waiting to go off' ... [VERSES FOR THE DEAD has] a nerve-wracking finish. Readers will love the quirky characters in this clever yarn. Pendergast and Coldmoon make an excellent pair. "





Crucible: A Thriller (Sigma Force Novels) by James Rollins

"Superb and scintillating...Rollins shades Crucible with equal measures of science and speculation, mixed in typically brilliant fashion and propelling him past the likes of Wilbur Smith and Alistair MacLean to claim the mantle of the greatest action-adventure writer of this or any generation."




The New Iberia Blues: A Dave Robicheaux Novel by James Lee Burke

“We’re hanging on for Robicheaux’s pensées...and those angry outbursts when Robicheaux lets it rip: 'I don’t think you get it,' he tells one of the movie people. 'Louisiana is America’s answer to Guatemala. Our legal system is a joke. Our legislature is a mental asylum. How’d you like to spend a few days in our parish prison?' Only if there’s a new James Lee Burke novel in the cell."


Friday, March 22, 2019

New Bestsellers have hit the shelves! Check one out today!


An Anonymous Girl: A Novel by Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen


“Psychological suspense is a genre that needs to be handled with kid gloves...Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen seem to have mastered the formula...a creepy-crawly tale.”






Judgment: A Novel by Joseph Finder



"Joseph Finder has masterfully blended the psychological and legal thrillers in “Judgment,” a book that combines his penchant for nuanced plotting with the rapid-fire pacing his more recent titles have displayed.”




Never Tell: A Novel (A D.D. Warren and Flora Dane Novel) by Lisa Gardner



“This is easily Gardner’s most ambitious, complex tale ever, a shattering emotional journey that’s utterly relentless in pacing and suspense. Tell everyone that Never Tell is an early candidate for the best thriller of 2019.”






The Night Tiger: A Novel by Yangsze Choo


“This is the kind of book that when you read it, you really are transported back to that time and place… [Choo has] captured, in a very atmospheric way, the time period and the superstitions [of colonial Malaysia in the 1930s]. It’s a pretty wonderful book.”
NPR


Wednesday, March 6, 2019

More new movies have hit the shelves!

Blackkklansman

Actors: John David Washington, Adam Driver, Topher Grace, Corey Hawkins
Directors: Spike Lee
Rated: R  Restricted
Studio: Universal Pictures Home Entertainment
Run Time: 135 minutes

Director Spike Lee's drama was produced by the team behind Get Out and offers another provocative exploration of American race relations. In the midst of the 1970s civil rights movement, Ron Stallworth (John David Washington) becomes the first black detective on the Colorado Springs Police Department. He sets out to prove his worth by infiltrating the local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan and convinces his Jewish colleague (Adam Driver) to go undercover as a white supremacist.



Mission: Impossible – Fallout

Actors: Tom Cruise, Rebecca Ferguson, Vanessa Kirby, Henry Cavill, Michelle Monaghan
Directors: Christopher McQuarrie
Rated:  PG-13  Parents Strongly Cautioned
Studio: PARAMOUNT
Run Time: 147 minutes

Two years after Ethan Hunt had successfully captured Solomon Lane, the remnants of the Syndicate have reformed into another organization called the Apostles. Under the leadership of a mysterious fundamentalist known only as John Lark, the organization is planning on acquiring three plutonium cores. Ethan and his team are sent to Berlin to intercept them, but the mission fails when Ethan saves Luther and the Apostles escape with the plutonium. With CIA agent August Walker joining the team, Ethan and his allies must now find the plutonium cores before it's too late.




Widows

Actors: Viola Davis, Michelle Rodriguez, Elizabeth Debicki, Cynthia Erivo, Liam Neeson
Directors: Steve McQueen
Rated:  R  Restricted
Studio: 20th Century Fox
Run Time: 130 minutes

"Widows" is the story of four women with nothing in common except a debt left behind by their dead husbands' criminal activities. Set in contemporary Chicago, amid a time of turmoil, tensions build when Veronica (Viola Davis), Alice (Elizabeth Debicki), Linda (Michelle Rodriguez) and Belle (Cynthia Erivo) take their fate into their own hands and conspire to forge a future on their own terms.

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Don't miss out on these great films

You Were Never Really Here

Actors: Joaquin Phoenix, Alessandro Nivola
Directors: Lynne Ramsay
Rated:  R  Restricted
Studio: Lions Gate
Run Time: 94 minutes

Balancing between feverish dreamlike hallucinations of a tormented past and a grim disoriented reality, the grizzled Joe--a traumatised Gulf War veteran and now an unflinching hired gun who lives with his frail elderly mother--has just finished yet another successful job. With an infernal reputation of being a brutal man of results, the specialised in recovering missing teens enforcer will embark on a blood-drenched rescue mission, when Nina, the innocent 13-year-old daughter of an ambitious New York senator, never returns home. But amidst half-baked leads and a desperate desire to shake off his shoulders the heavy burden of a personal hell, Joe's frenzied plummet into the depths of Tartarus is inevitable, and every step Joe takes to flee the pain, brings him closer to the horrors of insanity. In the end, what is real, and what is a dream? Can there be a new chapter in Joe's life when he keeps running around in circles?






First Man

Actors: Ryan Gosling, Claire Foy, Jason Clarke, Kyle Chandler, Corey Stoll
Directors: Damien Chazelle
Rated:  PG-13  Parents Strongly Cautioned
Studio: Universal Pictures Home Entertainment
Run Time: 141 minutes

A Biopic on the life of the legendary American Astronaut Neil Armstrong from 1961-1969, on his journey to becoming the first human to walk the moon. Exploring the sacrifices and costs on the Nation and Neil himself, during one of the most dangerous missions in the history of space travel.




The Rider

Actors: Brady Jandreau, Lilly Jandreau, Tim Jandreau, Lane Scott, Cat Clifford
Directors: Chloe Zhao
Rated:  R  Restricted
Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
Run Time: 103 minutes

Brady Blackburn, a rodeo bronc rider with some renown, learned everything he knows about horses and riding from his parents, Wayne and the now deceased Mari Blackburn. Brady is recovering from a fall off a bronking horse in a rodeo, the most serious of the injuries being a skull fracture which required a metal plate being inserted into his head. Including checking himself out of the hospital earlier than advised, Brady is determined to get back up onto the literal and proverbial horse as quickly as possible as being a cowboy is all he knows. But deep in his heart he knows that returning to the rodeo in particular is something that is probably not in the cards without increased risks, which is eventually confirmed by his doctor who tells him that he cannot sustain another serious head injury without some major consequence. He does not even want his friends and family to treat him with kid gloves in being able to do any of those physical activities which are part and parcel for him of being a man and a cowboy. Brady has to come to some realization as to this fact and come to terms with it - which is difficult even as his best friend, former rodeo rider Lane Scott will forever be institutionalized needing around the clock medical care from a similar accident - or end up killing himself physically in the attempt to bronc again, or killing himself emotionally in not being able to do what he loves.




Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Don't miss out on these family favorites!

Isle Of Dogs

Actors: Bryan Cranston, Koyu Rankin, Edward Norton, Bob Balaban, Bill Murray
Directors: Wes Anderson
Rated:  PG-13  Parents Strongly Cautioned
Studio: 20th Century Fox
Run Time: 102 minutes

An outbreak of dog flu has spread through the city of Megasaki, Japan, and Mayor Kobayashi has demanded all dogs to be sent to Trash Island. On the island, a young boy named Atari sets out to find his lost dog, Spots, with the help of five other dogs... with many obstacles along the way.



Paddington 2

Actors: Ben Wishaw, Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins, Brendan Gleeson, Julie Walters
Directors: Paul King
Rated:  PG  Parental Guidance Suggested
Studio: Warner Brothers
Run Time: 120 minutes

Paddington is happily settled with the Brown family in Windsor Gardens, where he has become a popular member of the community, spreading joy and marmalade wherever he goes. While searching for the perfect present for his beloved Aunt Lucy's 100th birthday, Paddington spots a unique pop-up book in Mr. Gruber's antique shop, and embarks upon a series of odd jobs to buy it. But when the book is stolen, it's up to Paddington and the Browns to unmask the thief.



Wednesday, February 13, 2019

More new movies have hit the shelves! Who has the popcorn?

The Wife

Actors: Glenn Close, Jonathan Pryce, Christian Slater, Max Irons, Harry Lloyd
Directors: Björn Runge
Rated:  R  Restricted
Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
Run Time: 100 minutes

Behind any great man, there's always a greater woman - and you're about to meet her. Joan Castleman (Glenn Close): a highly intelligent and still-striking beauty - the perfect devoted wife. Forty years spent sacrificing her own talent, dreams and ambitions to fan the flames of her charismatic husband Joe (Jonathan Pryce) and his skyrocketing literary career. Ignoring his infidelities and excuses because of his "art" with grace and humour. Their fateful pact has built a marriage upon uneven compromises. And Joan's reached her breaking point. On the eve of Joe's Nobel Prize for Literature, the crown jewel in a spectacular body of work, Joan's coup de grace is to confront the biggest sacrifice of her life and secret of his career.







Tully

Actors: Charlize Theron, Mackenzie Davis, Ron Livingston, Mark Duplass
Directors: Jason Reitman
Rated:  R  Restricted
Studio: Universal Pictures Home Entertainment
Run Time: 96 minutes

The film is about Marlo, a mother of three, including a newborn. Marlo's brother gives her a night nanny as a gift. Hesitant with the extravagance at first, Marlo comes to form a unique bond with the thoughtful, surprising, and sometimes challenging young nanny named Tully.





Eighth Grade

Actors: Elsie Fisher, Josh Hamilton, Emily Robinson
Director: Bo Burnham
Rated:  R  Restricted
Studio: Lions Gate
Run Time: 94 minutes

In his feature film directorial debut, comedian Bo Burnham deftly encapsulates the awkwardness, angst, self-loathing and reinvention that a teenage girl goes through on the cusp of high school. Given that the 27-year-old stand-up comic achieved fame as a teenager himself through YouTube by riffing on his insecurities, he is uniquely capable as the film's writer and director to tell the story of Kayla, an anxious girl navigating the final days of her eighth grade year, despite creating a protagonist w female instead of male. Like Burnham did more than a decade ago, 13-year-old Kayla turns to YouTube to express herself, where she makes advice blogs in which she pretends to have it all together. In reality, Kayla is sullen and silent around her single father and her peers at school, carrying out most of her interactions with her classmates on Instagram and Twitter. Her YouTube videos are a clever narrative tool that provide insight into her inner hopes and dreams, much like an inspirational online diary. One of Eighth Grade's biggest triumphs is in its realism.





Leave No Trace

Actors: Ben Foster, Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie, Jeff Kober, Dale Dickey
Directors: Debra Granik
Rated:  PG  Parental Guidance Suggested
Studio: Universal Pictures Home Entertainment
Run Time: 110 minutes

Will (Ben Foster) and his teenage daughter, Tom (Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie), have lived off the grid for years in the forests of Portland, Oregon. When their idyllic life is shattered, both are put into social services. After clashing with their new surroundings, Will and Tom set off on a harrowing journey back to their wild homeland.




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