Monday, February 19, 2018

This President's day, spend some time with these political New Bestsellers



Bobby Kennedy: A Raging Spirit by Chris Matthews


“Chris Matthews evocatively brings the man and his moment back to life. It is a story that needs to be told again as a heroic counterpoint to the Trump era’s fundamental disrespect for the idea that politics can be a noble profession.”






Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House by Michael Wolff

"Wolff’s lasting achievement here is not his headline-grabbing revelations but the skillful, enthralling, and utterly terrifying way he depicts the unqualified, unprepared, and downright unusual characters to be found wandering the halls of the White House in the first half of 2017 as well as their near bloodsport-level conflicts."




Grant by Ron Chernow

“This is a good time for Ron Chernow’s fine biography of Ulysses S. Grant to appear… As history, it is remarkable, full of fascinating details sure to make it interesting both to those with the most cursory knowledge of Grant’s life and to those who have read his memoirs or any of several previous biographies… For all its scholarly and literary strengths, this book’s greatest service is to remind us of Grant’s significant achievements at the end of the war and after, which have too long been overlooked and are too important today to be left in the dark… As Americans continue the struggle to defend justice and equality in our tumultuous and divisive era, we need to know what Grant did when our country’s very existence hung in the balance. If we still believe in forming a more perfect union, his steady and courageous example is more valuable than ever.”







Playing with Fire: The 1968 Election and the Transformation of American Politics by Lawrence O'Donnell


“An excellent account of the 1968 presidential race, a political season of spoilers, outsiders, and broken machines eerily like our own time . . . [A] sharp, nuanced account . . . A careful, circumstantial study that compares favorably to Theodore H. White's presidents series and that politics junkies will find irresistible.”



Promise Me, Dad: A Year of Hope, Hardship, and Purpose by Joe Biden



"Biden splices a heartbreaking story with an election story and a foreign affairs story. And in so doing, he offers something for everyone, no matter which strand draws you in."

                                                          


Friday, February 16, 2018

Thrilling new films are @ your Library!

It

Rated: R Restricted
Run Time: 120 minutes

Director: Andy Muschietti
Stars: Bill SkarsgÄrd, Jaeden Lieberher, Finn Wolfhard
Genres: Drama | Horror | Thriller

In the Town of Derry, the local kids are disappearing one by one, leaving behind bloody remains. In a place known as 'The Barrens', a group of seven kids are united by their horrifying and strange encounters with an evil clown and their determination to kill It.





Get Out

Rated:  R Restricted
Run Time: 104 minutes

Director: Jordan Peele
Stars: Daniel Kaluuya, Allison Williams, Bradley Whitford
Genres: Horror | Mystery | Thriller

Chris and his girlfriend Rose go upstate to visit her parents for the weekend. At first, Chris reads the family's overly accommodating behavior as nervous attempts to deal with their daughter's interracial relationship, but as the weekend progresses, a series of increasingly disturbing discoveries lead him to a truth that he never could have imagined.




Personal Shopper

Rated: R Restricted
Run Time: 105 minutes

Director: Olivier Assayas
Stars: Kristen Stewart, Lars Eidinger, Sigrid Bouaziz
Genres: Drama | Horror | Mystery | Thriller

It's been already three months since the sudden death of her 27-year-old twin brother Lewis from a congenital malformation of the heart, and Maureen, a young fashionista, assistant to a celebrity woman and a capable medium, still hasn't made any contact with him. Spending her time between high profile fashion establishments and the abandoned Lewis' house in Paris, Maureen is silently battling with the gut-wrenching grief and sorrow, while at the same time, looking for a sign from her deceased brother after an oath taken between the twins. Aloof, disoriented and still mourning, wraithlike Maureen attuned to the ethereal realm, is inevitably caught between this world and the spiritual, always looking for portholes and a sign that would prove her brother right, however, in vain. Unexpectedly, as the days pass by swiftly and the random apparitions become more frequent, Maureen will start to receive strange text messages from an unknown sender who seems to know a lot about her, but in the end, if there is still no sign of the beloved Lewis, is there any point in waiting?



Wednesday, February 14, 2018

New! On shelves now! These librarian loved authors!



Deep Freeze (A Virgil Flowers Novel) by John Sandford



“Add a gripping storyline, a generous helping of exquisitely conceived characters and laugh-out-loud humor that produce explosive guffaws, not muted chuckles, and you’re in for the usual late-night, don’t-even-think-of-stopping treat when Flowers hits town.”






The Midnight Line: A Jack Reacher Novel by Lee Child




“The book is very smart . . . [and] suggests something that has not been visible in the series’ previous entries: a creeping sadness in Reacher’s wanderings that, set here among the vast and empty landscapes of Wyoming, resembles the peculiarly solitary loneliness of the classic American hero. This return to form is also a hint of new ground to be covered.”








End Game (Will Robie Series) by David Baldacci



"Hitting on all cylinders from beginning to end, David Baldacci brings back his best character with a bang."









Origin: A Novel by Dan Brown



"Origin asks the questions Where do we come from? Where are we going? They are questions about humanity--but they could just as easily be questions about Robert Langdon.  The Mickey Mouse watch-wearing, claustrophobic, always-near-trouble symbology professor is back in Dan Brown’s latest book. And just like he was in his original exploits (Angels & Demons and The Da Vinci Code), Dr. Langdon is once again wrapped up in a global-scale event that could have massive ramifications on the world’s religions. As he does in all his novels, Brown[‘s] extensive research on art, architecture, and history informs every page."





The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale and the American Tragedy in Vietnam by Max Boot


“Judicious and absorbing…Boot, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, brings solid credentials to this enterprise…Here he draws on a range of material, official and personal…What emerges is a picture of a man who from an early point possessed an unusual ability to relate to other people, a stereotypically American can-do optimism, an impatience with bureaucracy and a fascination with psychological warfare.”




From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death by Caitlin Doughty



“[Doughty’s] fascinating tour of rituals contains liturgies that readers will surely observe as rare, macabre, unbelievable, ancient, and precious―sometimes simultaneously.”


Friday, February 9, 2018

New movies have hit the shelves @ your Library!

Blade Runner 2049

Rated: R  Restricted
Run Time: 163 minutes

Director: Denis Villeneuve
Stars: Harrison Ford, Ryan Gosling, Ana de Armas, Robin Wright
Genres: Drama | Mystery | Sci-Fi | Thriller

Thirty years after the events of the first film, a new blade runner, LAPD Officer K (Ryan Gosling), unearths a long-buried secret that has the potential to plunge what's left of society into chaos. K's discovery leads him on a quest to find Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), a former LAPD blade runner who has been missing for 30 years.




Detroit

Rated:  R  Restricted
Run Time: 143 minutes

Director: Kathryn Bigelow
Stars: John Boyega, Anthony Mackie, Algee Smith
Genres: Crime | Drama | Thriller

A police raid in Detroit in 1967 results in one of the largest RACE riots in United States history. The story is centred around the Algiers Motel incident, which occurred in Detroit, Michigan on July 25, 1967, during the racially charged 12th Street Riot. It involves the death of three black men and the brutal beatings of nine other people: seven black men and two white women.




The Lost City of Z

Rated: PG-13 Parents Strongly Cautioned
Run Time: 141 minutes

Director: James Gray
Stars: Charlie Hunnam, Robert Pattinson, Sienna Miller
Genres: Adventure | Biography | Drama | History

The Lost City of Z tells the incredible true story of British explorer Percy Fawcett, who journeys into the Amazon at the dawn of the 20th century and discovers evidence of a previously unknown, advanced civilization that may have once inhabited the region. Despite being ridiculed by the scientific establishment who regard indigenous populations as "savages," the determined Fawcett - supported by his devoted wife, son and aide de camp returns time and again to his beloved jungle in an attempt to prove his case, culminating in his mysterious disappearance in 1925.



Wednesday, May 31, 2017

You are not going to want to miss out on these new bestsellers

Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?: And Other Questions You Should Have Answers to When You Work in the White House by Alyssa Mastromonaco and Lauren Oyler

"A candid and charming memoir of her unexpected career in government...The memoir abounds with intimate glimpses of Washington, D.C., celebrities (Biden, Clinton, Michelle Obama, and scores more) and cheerfully dispensed survival strategies. An entertaining look inside the White House."





A Piece of the World: A Novel by Christina Baker Kline


“Andrew Wyeth’s celebrated painting Christina’s World has her back to the viewer, but Kline turns her to face the reader, simultaneously equipping her with a back story and a lyrical voice...A character portrait that is painterly, sensuous, and sympathetic.”



The Black Book by James Patterson



"The mystery is authentic, the lead-up genuinely suspenseful, and the leading characters and situations more memorable than Patterson's managed in quite a while."




Man Overboard: An Ali Reynolds Novel (Ali Reynolds Series) by J.A. Jance


… Jance (Random Acts, 2016, etc.) can’t seem to keep out of her own way or avoid sidelining the supposed heroine in this 15th franchise installment. But the character who does take the lead deserves to keep it, and the ending helps make up for the cumbersome plot.

Monday, May 29, 2017

These bestsellers have hit the shelves



The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See



“…a riveting exercise in fictional anthropology.”


Echoes in Death: An Eve Dallas Novel (In Death, Book 44) by J.D. Robb


…Robb knows her audience will be highly sympathetic to a police heroine who has to walk a crime scene in uncomfortably fashionable stiletto heels, but along the winding trail to the easily spotted villain, she's not afraid to throw in some descriptions that will earn this installment an R for serious sexual violence.


Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah


“[A] compelling new memoir . . . By turns alarming, sad and funny, [Trevor Noah’s] book provides a harrowing look, through the prism of Mr. Noah’s family, at life in South Africa under apartheid. . . . In the end, Born a Crime is not just an unnerving account of growing up in South Africa under apartheid, but a love letter to the author’s remarkable mother.”




If Not for You: A Novel by Debbie Macomber


This is a trademark Macomber romance in all the best ways. Sam and Beth may not have instant chemistry, but they are both instantly likable characters. … A heartwarming, uplifting and deliciously romantic tale with vibrant characters and a wide range of emotions.


Silence Fallen (A Mercy Thompson Novel) by Patricia Briggs



There are twists and turns aplenty to keep the reader engrossed. And of course, this being a Mercy Thompson novel, the two threads and other subplots introduced throughout the story all come together nicely at the end to form a rousing conclusion.


Blitzed: Drugs in the Third Reich by Norman Ohler and Shaun Whiteside



“The strengths of Ohler’s account lie not only in the rich array of rare documents he mines and the archival images he reproduces to accompany the text, but also in his character studies… Ohler effectively captures Hitler’s pathetic dependence on his doctor and the bizarre intimacy of their bond…Blitzed makes for provocative reading.”





A Conjuring of Light: A Novel (Shades of Magic) by V. E. Schwab



"Desperate gambits, magical battles, and meaningful sacrifice make this a thrilling read.”



Mangrove Lightning (A Doc Ford Novel) by Randy Wayne White



“White comes up with a novel way to re-examine historical crimes: reincarnate the criminals as fictional present-day killers. It's a crazy idea, and some crazy developments trail in its wake, but it works.”


Wednesday, May 24, 2017

More bestsellers are ready for you @ your library


Bone Box: A Decker/Lazarus Novel by Faye Kellerman

An unwelcome discovery Rina Lazarus makes on a woodsy trail begins what feels like an endless new investigation for her husband, Greenbury Police Detective Peter Decker (The Theory of Death, 2015, etc.). … A low-concept small-town procedural that delivers more authenticity than suspense, with so many forgettable suspects, witnesses, and potential victims that you’ll need a grade book to keep them straight.




Lincoln in the Bardo: A Novel by George Saunders

“Exhilarating . . . Ruthless and relentless in its evocation not only of Lincoln and his quandary, but also of the tenuous existential state shared by all of us.”





Gunmetal Gray (Gray Man) by Mark Greaney


“Courtland Gentry, also known as the Gray Man, is everything you’d want in a fictional professional killer...[he] always gets the job done for the US of A, and he entertains while doing it...this one is fat, fast, and fun. Clancy's spirit lives on.”


Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J. D. Vance


“[A] compassionate, discerning sociological analysis…Combining thoughtful inquiry with firsthand experience, Mr. Vance has inadvertently provided a civilized reference guide for an uncivilized election, and he’s done so in a vocabulary intelligible to both Democrats and Republicans. Imagine that.”




Dodge City: Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, and the Wickedest Town in the American West by Tom Clavin


"The author paints a lively portrait of the town and its denizens, particularly those well-known enforcers. Along the way, he reveals a few lesser-known aspects of their characters . . . . A must-have for buffs."


Exit West: A Novel by Mohsin Hamid


“In spare, crystalline prose, Hamid conveys the experience of living in a city under siege with sharp, stabbing immediacy. He shows just how swiftly ordinary life — with all its banal rituals and routines — can morph into the defensive crouch of life in a war zone. … [and] how insidiously violence alters the calculus of daily life. … By mixing the real and the surreal, and using old fairy-tale magic, Hamid has created a fictional universe that captures the global perils percolating beneath today’s headlines.”




The Devil's Triangle (A Brit in the FBI) by Catherine Coulter and J.T. Ellison


FBI agents hunt for the Ark of the Covenant. … After all that’s been written about the ark in countless adventure stories, it’s hard to find any new ground to cover. But there are action and thrills aplenty in Coulter and Ellison’s new addition to their Brit in the FBI series (The End Game, 2015, etc.).

Writer, Sailor, Soldier, Spy: Ernest Hemingway's Secret Adventures, 1935-1961 by Nicholas Reynolds



“[An] engrossing story of Hemingway’s disillusionment with American politics, his sympathy with communism, and his attraction to adventure and subversion.”



Monday, May 22, 2017

You are not going to want to miss these new bestsellers


Richard Nixon: The Life by John A. Farrell

"[Nixon is] an electrifying subject, a muttering Lear, of perennial interest to anyone with even an average curiosity about politics or psychology. The real test of a good Nixon biography, given how many there are, is far simpler: Is it elegantly written? And, even more important, can it tolerate paradoxes and complexity, the spikier stuff that distinguishes real-life sinners from comic-book villains? The answer, in the case of Richard Nixon, is yes, on both counts.”




Etched in Bone (A Novel of the Others) by Anne Bishop



… Etched in Bone gives readers an action-packed and emotional farewell to a long-running and enjoyable arc.



The Women in the Castle: A Novel by Jessica Shattuck


“Moving . . . Shattuck’s achievement—beyond unfolding a plot that surprises and devastates—is in her subtle exploration of what a moral righteousness looks like in the aftermath of the war, when communities and lives must be rebuilt, together.”





Vicious Circle (A Joe Pickett Novel) by C. J. Box



“Bracingly familiar pleasures expertly packaged...first-timers will be intrigued and fans amply rewarded.”



Mississippi Blood: A Novel (Penn Cage Novels) by Greg Iles


“A superb entertainment that is a work of power, distinction and high seriousness... also (a) prime example of what the thriller--and other forms of so-called ‘genre’ fiction--can accomplish when pushed beyond traditional limits.”





The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit by Michael Finkel



"Campfire-friendly and thermos-ready, easily drained in one warm, rummy slug… Raises a variety of profound questions—about the role of solitude, about the value of suffering, about the diversity of human needs."

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Check the shelves for these new bestsellers

Crimson Death (Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter) by Laurell K. Hamilton

“Number one New York Times bestseller Hamilton is still thrilling fans...with her amazing multifaceted characters and intricate multilayered world, a mix of erotic romance, crime-drama, and paranormal/fantasy fiction. Her descriptive prose is gritty and raw, with a mosaic of humor and horror to tell this complex, well-detailed story. But it’s her enigmatic stable of stars that continues to shine, managing their improbable interpersonal relationship dynamics.”


Without Warning: A J.B. Collins Novel by Joel C. Rosenberg

… When it comes to building suspense and tension, Rosenberg is merciless. With an unflinching plot that moves at blazing speeds, Rosenberg has packed more twists and turns into this novel than ever before as he continues to examine the threat ISIS poses to the rest of the world. The jaw-dropping ending alone is worth the price of admission, and will leave readers speechless. …





This Life I Live: One Man's Extraordinary, Ordinary Life and the Woman Who Changed It Forever by Rory Feek

The chapters likely to linger in readers' minds, however, are the ones illuminated by Joey’s presence. Rory writes on the first page, “I am famous for loving my wife.” Theirs was a powerful connection, one that overused words like “love” and “soulmate” can’t fully encapsulate, he says. Instead, he describes their connection as “magical.”



Banana Cream Pie Murder (A Hannah Swensen Mystery) by Joanne Fluke

Newlywed Hannah Swensen Barton (Wedding Cake Murder, 2016, etc.) is disconcerted to find that her husband Ross’ favorite dessert is a clue in a murder investigation. … Baking maven Fluke wants to have her cake and eat it too. Grafting Hannah’s new relationship with Ross onto her lingering attachment to two previous boyfriends, her family of origin, her business, and the rest of the Lake Eden crew leaves precious little room for mystery.


The Cutthroat (An Isaac Bell Adventure) by Clive Cussler and Justin Scott

It’s No. 10 in the Cussler and Scott (The Gangster, 2016, etc.) series chronicling the adventures of rich man–sleuth Isaac Bell and the Van Dorn Detective Agency as the 20th century dawns. … Despite an awkward transition or two and a bit of padding (there’s a recipe for Welsh rarebit), the Bell series hits the right note for those who like crime fiction with a unique setting.


Heartbreak Hotel: An Alex Delaware Novel by Jonathan Kellerman

Child psychologist Dr. Alex Delaware (Breakdown, 2016, etc.) deals with his oldest client yet, a deceptively sweet old lady who gently importunes him to provide his services but dies without explaining why. … Entertaining as the conscientious excavation of ancient misdeeds is, it all ends up having disappointingly little to do with the motive and the culprit in the unlikely murder of the tale’s most charming character.


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