Wednesday, June 1, 2011

More ideas for a healthier you

The Amen Solution: The Brain Healthy Way to Lose Weight and Keep It Off by Daniel G. Amen

From Barnes & Noble


Dr. Daniel Amen's new weight loss plan has two main premises: The first is that most weight problems originate in our brains, not in our tummies. The second is that in diets as in clothing stores, one size doesn't fit all. The Amen Solution invites readers to identify their individual brain type and then implement the brain-based program to reduce weight and keep it off. Moreover, this plan is designed to improve your memory, mind-set, and general wellbeing.




If It Makes You Healthy: More Than 100 Delicious Recipes Inspired by the Seasons by Sheryl Crow, Chuck White and Mary Goodbody

Publishers Weekly

More personal and more enlightening than the typical celebrity cookbook, this health-focused collection from Sheryl Crow and her personal chef is a refreshing addition to an increasingly crowded field. When the singer-songwriter was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2006, she reassessed her eating habits, which consisted of on-the-run tuna sandwiches and catered dressing-room food. The self-admitted noncook consulted with a nutritionist and hired chef Chuck White to cook for her on the road. This collection of recipes represents his greatest hits—a warm hummus soup with cilantro pesto and garlic pita chips, and a tuna salad freshened up with green apple. Though Crow has not adopted a vegan lifestyle, many of these dishes are meatless, emphasizing colorful vegetables and fresh preparations. Exotic inventions include a sophisticated spin on peanut butter and jelly that incorporates cashew butter and fruit. Other dishes swap out ingredients to make comfort foods more wholesome and nutritious: a vegan reuben made with "corned beef seitan" and a chocolate mousse made from whipped avocado. Crow's nutritionist, Rachel Beller, offers tips throughout to educate readers. White's easy-to-follow recipes, coupled with Crow's down-to-earth narrative, make their collaboration a successful duet. Photos.




The Healthy Home: Simple Truths to Protect Your Family from Hidden Household Dangers by Dave Wentz and Myron Wentz


From the Publisher


In The Healthy Home, a father and son--Dr. Myron Wentz, well-known microbiologist and founder of the USANA Corporation, and Dave Wentz, CEO of the USANA Corporation--take readers on a tour of a specific home for a look at the surprising health risks posed by the everyday products and behaviors of a modern family. Beginning in the bedroom and ending in the garage and backyard, readers learn about the degenerative effects of toxins in the home and receive simple solutions to help minimize exposure without foregoing convenience.



The Healthy Homeis not a comprehensive tome on modern health hazards; nor is it a treatise on eco-conscious living. Instead, the book focuses on the most important environment--the home--and the problems that can most easily be lessened or eliminated. Busy parents who suspect that they should be doing more to protect their family but don't know where to start will learn about practical changes they can make in the next fifteen minutes, fifteen days, or fifteen months to create a haven for healthier living.





The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement by David Brooks


Publishers Weekly


New York Times columnist Brooks (Bobos in Paradise) raids Malcolm Gladwell's pop psychology turf in a wobbly treatise on brain science, human nature, and public policy. Essentially a satirical novel interleaved with disquisitions on mirror neurons and behavioral economics, the narrative chronicles the life cycle of a fictional couple—Harold, a historian working at a think tank, and Erica, a Chinese-Chicana cable-TV executive—as a case study of the nonrational roots of social behaviors, from mating and shopping to voting. Their story lets Brooks mock the affluent and trendy while advancing soft neoconservative themes: that genetically ingrained emotions and biases trump reason; that social problems require cultural remedies (charter schools, not welfare payments); that the class divide is about intelligence, deportment, and taste, not money or power. Brooks is an engaging guide to the "cognitive revolution" in psychology, but what he shows us amounts mainly to restating platitudes. (Women like men with money, we learn, while men like women with breasts.) His attempt to inflate recent research on neural mechanisms into a grand worldview yields little except buzz concepts—"society is a layering of networks"—no more persuasive than the rationalist dogmas he derides.



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