Monday, November 28, 2011

Intrigue and adventure are here @ your library

Flash and Bones by Kathy Reichs

Publishers Weekly -
The discovery of an old corpse in a barrel of asphalt in landfill bordering the Charlotte Motor Speedway in Charlotte, N.C., propels Reichs's solid 14th thriller featuring forensic anthropologist Temperance Brennan (after Spider Bones). Brennan feels the pressure to make a quick ID, with race week approaching and the speedway a major stop on the NASCAR circuit. Wayne Gamble, whose older sister, Cindi, an aspiring NASCAR driver, disappeared in 1998 with her right wing leaning boyfriend, hopes Brennan can help, perhaps by identifying the barrel body as his sister. But as Brennan pokes around into the cold case, new issues crop up with the FBI claiming jurisdiction because of possible bioterrorism. Caught between two sparring cops, Erskine "Skinny" Slidell of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg PD and Cotton Galimore, the speedway's head of security, Brennan must tread carefully to find the long-buried truth. Reichs imbues this fusion of past and present with her signature blend of forensic know-how and deeply felt characters. 




Full Black by Brad Thor

From the Publisher-

#1 New York Times bestselling author Brad Thor brings readers his darkest and most intriguing thriller yet—a terrifying story of espionage and betrayal—brilliantly paced with superb nonstop action.
Born in the shadows and kept from heads of state, there are some missions so deadly, so sensitive, that they simply don’t exist.
When one such mission goes horribly wrong, a wave of dramatic terrorist attacks is set in motion. Their goal: the complete and total collapse of the United States.
With the CIA’s intelligence abilities hobbled, former Navy SEAL Team 6 member turned covert counterterrorism operative Scot Harvath launches an audacious plan to infiltrate the terrorists’ network and prevent one of the biggest threats the United States has ever faced.
Simultaneously, a foreign wet work team has been sent to California. Their target: one of Hollywood’s most famous filmmakers.
While working on a secret documentary project, movie producer Larry Salomon has unknowingly exposed one of the world’s wealthiest and most politically connected powerbrokers—a man with a radical anti-American agenda poised to plunge the nation into deadly, irreversible chaos.
As the plots rocket to their pulse-pounding conclusion and the identities of the perpetrators are laid stunningly bare, Harvath will be left with only one means to save America. Unable to trust anyone, he will be forced to go Full Black.
Intense and frighteningly realistic, FULL BLACK is, hands down, Brad Thor’s most riveting thriller to date.






The Hypnotist by Lars Kepler 

Kirkus Reviews -
A new star enters the firmament of Scandinavian thrillerdom, joining the likes of Larsson, Nesbø and Mankell.

Kepler, a pseudonym for what the publisher describes as "a literary couple who live in Sweden," continues in the Stygian—or, better, Stiegian—tradition of unveiling the dark rivers that swirl under the seemingly placid and pacific Nordic exterior. Scarcely has the novel opened when we find a scene of extreme mayhem: A schoolteacher and his librarian wife, pillars of their small Stockholm-area community, have been savagely butchered, and their young daughter, too, with a teenage son sliced to ribbons and left for dead. Enter Erik Maria Bark, a therapist and hypnotist called onto the scene by the supervising physician and a world-weary (naturally) police investigator, Joona Linna, who theorizes that the killer had waited for the father, a soccer referee in his off hours, hacked him into pieces, then headed to his house to dispatch the rest of the family, suggesting at least some acquaintance. "It happened in that order?" asks Bark, ever methodical, to which Linna responds, "In my opinion."Both men are guarded, for both have been wounded in the past, and both are fighting battles of their own in the present. Their psychic conflicts are nothing compared to those that rage through the scissors- and knife-wielding types they encounter in trying to get to the bottom of the crime, which takes them across miles and years. Kepler handles a complex plot assuredly, though the momentary switch from third- to first-person narration in midstream, as well as the shifts forward and backward in time, may induce whiplash. (They're for a good reason.) Linna and Bark make a great crime-solving pair precisely because they puzzle each other so thoroughly—says Bark, for instance, "The patient always speaks the truth under hypnosis. But it's only a matter of what he himself perceives as the truth." To which Linna responds, "What is it you're trying to say?" Indeed.
What Bark is trying to say is that there are monsters hiding everywhere beneath the reasonable and rational, and Kepler's book makes for a satisfying and scary testimonial.



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