Friday, July 17, 2015

Stop by and check out these great summer reads...

The Liar by Nora Roberts

Shelby Foxworth lost her husband. Then she lost her illusions …
The man who took her from Tennessee to an exclusive Philadelphia suburb left her in crippling debt. He was an adulterer and a liar, and when Shelby tracks down his safe-deposit box, she finds multiple IDs. The man she loved wasn’t just dead. He never really existed.
Shelby takes her three-year-old daughter and heads south to seek comfort in her hometown, where she meets someone new: Griff Lott, a successful contractor. But her husband had secrets she has yet to discover. Even in this small town, surrounded by loved ones, danger is closer than she knows–and threatens Griff, as well. And an attempted murder is only the beginning …




Death Wears a Beauty Mask and Other Stories by Mary Higgins Clark

“A gem…a tale with all of Clark’s trademarks: multiple twists, rising tension and a true whodunit. It’s a story to savor, as are the remaining pieces – all previously published – in the collection…There’s something about Mary, and that something is her unfailing ability to grip her legion of readers. And those fans are in for a triple treat as her anniversary year proceeds.”



The Skull Throne by Peter V. Brett

…The powerful saga of humans winnowed to the brink of extinction by night-stalking demons, and the survivors who fight back, has kept readers breathless as they eagerly turned the pages. Now the thrilling fourth volume, The Skull Throne, raises the stakes as it carries the action in shocking new directions. …







The Dream Lover by Elizabeth Berg

“Fantastic . . . a provocative and dazzling portrait . . . Berg tells a terrific story, while simultaneously exploring sexuality, art, and the difficult personal choices women artists in particular made—then and now—in order to succeed. . . . The book, imagistic and perfectly paced, full of dialogue that clips along, is a reader’s dream.”




The Lady from Zagreb (Bernie Gunther Series #10) by Philip Kerr

The great thing about these novels is that they don't feel researched, they feel lived in—in this case, much too painfully for Bernie.


The Road to Character by David Brooks

“David Brooks’s gift—as he might put it in his swift, engaging way—is for making obscure but potent social studies research accessible and even startling. . . . [The Road to Character is] a hyper-readable, lucid, often richly detailed human story. . . . In the age of the selfie, Brooks wishes to exhort us back to a semiclassical sense of self-restraint, self-erasure, and self-suspicion.”



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