Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Stop by and check out these new bestsellers!


Behind Closed Doors: A Novel by B. A. Paris


“This debut is guaranteed to haunt you ― especially if you’re about to tie the knot. Paris’s thriller asks the question: ‘The perfect marriage or the perfect lie?’ Jack and Grace, the couple at the center of this totally enthralling novel, are so clearly not what they seem you’ll have no choice but to read and read and read until their darkest secrets are revealed. Warning: brace yourself.”



Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty


“Stacked with her signature themes: female friendship, duplicity, the darkness lurking beneath lucky, ordinary suburban lives…The last twist, though, is nearly worth the wait, and what sets Moriarty’s writing apart…has as much to do with her canny insights into human nature as her clever plotting…Compelling.”




Right Behind You by Lisa Gardner


“Lisa Gardner had us all on the edge of our seats with 2016's Find Her, and now she's back to terrify us again.”


Razor Girl: A novel by Carl Hiaasen


"Rejoice, fans of American madness who've sought fulfillment in political reportage. South Florida's master farceur is back to reassure you that fiction is indeed stranger than truth. . . . [Hiaasen's] plotting is so fine-tuned that preposterous complications that would strain lesser novelists fit right into his antic world. Relax, enjoy, and marvel anew at the power of unbridled fictional invention."



Barkskins: A Novel by Annie Proulx

“Few authors are as uniquely qualified as Annie Proulx (The Shipping News) to sustain a novel as long as Barkskins. Pages melt away as readers zoom through the decades. Proulx’s story is bigger than any one man, one death, or even one culture: It’s about the effect civilization and society have had on the land. In her magical way, Proulx leaves the reader with an impression of not only a collection of people, but our people and the country that shaped us as we shaped it. This is Proulx at the height of her powers as an irreplaceable American voice.”

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